Business Beware! 6 Common Security Myths You Must Know

Business Beware! 6 Common Security Myths You Must Know

No business is immune to security risks, with 41 percent of global executives reporting one or more security incidents during the previous year. Even the smallest security incident can impact a business’s operations, crashing websites, causing significant data loss and leading customer information to fall into the wrong hands. Although many business owners are aware of these dangers, however, research shows that 63 percent of small businesses feel they are unprepared to counter security threats. Many fall prey to a few common security myths that have long been dispelled by experts.

Hackers Only Target Large Businesses

According to security experts, 70 percent of data breaches happen through small businesses, which become targets for hackers who seem them as vulnerable. Most of these data breaches can be avoided through a combination of security software and responsible employee behavior. Businesses of all sizes must take measures to keep their devices safe from criminal activity.

Good Detection Means High Resource Consumption

Software is available that not only prevents malicious activity but detects it as it’s happening. Some businesses erroneously assume this software slows servers down when, in fact, today’s best solutions are built specifically to perform without degrading performance. Since most of these solutions are hosted in the cloud, they can do the majority of the work without affecting a business’s devices or applications.

Avoiding Malware Is Easy

Like other consumers, business owners erroneously assume they couldn’t fall victim to a security issue since they’re always careful about the links they click and the files they download. Unfortunately, malicious activity comes in a variety of forms, including criminals who exploit vulnerabilities in a business’s software or server setup.

Take for instance the introduction of another very real threat to small business owners: Ransomware. This type of malware locks and encrypts an operating system until the user pays to regain access. These viruses can attack not only through a malicious download file but also through text messages, compromising a business’s entire system. Bitdefender recently conducted a study on U.S. and European Internet users and in the United States alone, more than 50 percent of ransomware victims paid the extortionists. Based on the survey results, Bitdefender predicts that attackers will likely aim at small to medium size businesses to generate more revenue than ever.

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Nobody Would Want My Information

Small businesses often make the mistake of assuming criminals wouldn’t hack into their systems since they have nothing that would be of interest. This line of thinking assumes that all intrusion attempts are targeted. In fact, many breaches are a result of automated phishing attempts looking for the sensitive information often stored on devices.

Businesses Should Wait Before Installing Upgrades

That new Windows Update could have a bug that will only be fixed once others report it. That line of thinking has businesses waiting until software has been on the market a while before downloading it. Those service packs and updates often contain security patches that help businesses avoid breaches.

Complex Passwords Will Keep My Network Safe

As valuable as complex passwords can be, users can have difficulty remembering them. This can lead to dangerous behaviors like writing them down. These bad habits can lead passwords to fall into the wrong hands. For best results, all employees should change their passwords, at least, every 60 days. Requirements can be set at the administrator level to make sure employees engage in safe password protection.

Security is an important issue for businesses of all sizes. When businesses research how to keep their servers safe and put solutions in place to protect themselves, they’ll be much less likely to fall victim to a security breach.

This article is written in partnership with, and sponsored by, Bitdefender. All views expressed are solely those of the author, not Bitdefender. For additional information from the sponsor on small business security, visit them on the web at www.bitdefender.com/. You can also join them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter at @Bitdefender