Why Being "Different" is Better Than Being "Better" When Selling to Competition

 

 

Why Being "Different" is Better Than Being "Better" When Selling to Competition

Adrian-Miller-Article

Consider this scenario:

 

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You have spent a great deal of time finding and selecting a new merchant services provider for your business. You evaluated the slew of options, interviewed a few companies, and made the best single choice. Sure there have been a few hiccups in setting up the service, and you will admit to being less than thrilled with their follow through and accountability. Yet here you are thinking, “The devil I know is better than the devil I don’t.”

And then, a sales rep from another, competing company calls to tell you about their product or service and exclaims, “We’re better.”

When I’m presented with this type of sales approach, I figure the sales rep is really saying: “Your decision-making was flawed. We are better, and now you are stuck with second-rate.

Speaking from experience, that sales logic doesn’t make me lean in closer and listen; in fact, it does just the opposite.

Have you ever tried to court a prospect with “We’re better”? Quit it! What should you do when you are selling to a prospect who is working with the competition? Consider the word different.

XYZ Enterprises is a fine choice for your business. But how about I tell you what makes us different?

Replacing the word “better” with different” is a subtle and strategic way of highlighting your strengths against your competitor’s weaknesses. If the prospect experiences only marginal service from your competitor, being different presents them with a vision of how they will receive optimal service from you instead. Differentiation in approach, methods, and delivery shows the prospect there is an alternative without demeaning their initial decision. Not to mention the improved service for their business means greater profits all around. (It doesn’t much matter if you are different and the results are the same. But an improvement? Now that’s persuasive!)

So the next time you hear “We’re happy with our current service provider,” make sure you take the time to explain your points of differentiation. Be detailed and give them a mental picture of the tangible improvements to their current situation (If they’re not interested in listening then your chances of making this sale are slim to none!)

Start now and practice. By making this one key change to your sales presentation, you’ll find yourself closing more business from new prospects. And that’s the goal, isn’t it?