8 Steps to Introduce Tech into a Non-Techy Business

8 Steps to Introduce Tech into a Non-Techy Business

When making a first impression, it is often recommended to engage eye contact, smile, offer a firm handshake, and use appropriate body language. Most of us are very capable of doing these small, yet important gestures, when we encounter new people. In case you have the unfortunate opportunity of introducing innovative technology to a non-techy business, here are some tips that can help you pull it off:

Find Your Early Adopters

Who are your ready and willing millennials? When a new employee joins a company, it is safe to assume that other employees with similar interests would most likely relate to him/her. A good employer you would have made the connection between them by him/herself. Finding your first fan base is an important first step.

Turn Your Early Adopters Into an Ambassador Community

Once you have your team of early adopters, you should try your best to engage them with your new product. One example is offering them exclusive benefits and incentive as a reward for their support. For instance, any employee that recommends the new technology to his colleagues and gets at least 10 to join, will get a coffee or pizza coupon.

Put a Bow Tie On It

In 2017, software should be appealing in an unconventional and fun way. A nicely wrapped product will be intriguing and will most likely invite people to ask you questions, which is your opportunity to explain that it is not only beautifully designed but also highly beneficial.

Engage Workers Around the Topics that Concern Them

Let’s say your company consists of the following departments: marketing, sales, finance, and admin and each includes some employees. Check in advance what are the main setbacks within these departments, and have your product solve them. Once your employees hear that your product solves their pain points, they will be yours.

Involve Everyone

Even if they seem irrelevant. Get them into the mix of the conversation. Some workers may be a little less relevant for this new product. However, if you eventually expose it to all, with no exceptions, your product will receive the highest level of respect as it will be considered a company asset and not a partial solution.

Be Honest

Address their fears, especially if they’re warranted, and don’t be afraid to point out the downsides of new technology.

Let's say that your company's workers will be inclined to take time off from ongoing work tasks, in order to learn the new technology, which is something that may deter some of them. You can and should definitely be upfront about the downsides of the product as well as about the upsides.

Create Follow-Ups

Just like introducing a new employee, if you want the new tech to be absorbed a simple intro is not enough. You need to follow up and create engaging communications that will eventually allow your employees to embrace the change.

Introducing the technology is only a stepping stone towards creating real engagement for it. You can think of regular newsletters, company meet-ups or any other creative ideas that will keep your workers in the loop and interested in what your product has to offer.

Set Up a Q&A About the New Technology

Your company workers will have questions and probably many of them. You can answer them personally but setting up a company FAQ will allow workers to prepare in advance as well as to hear other questions asked by fellow workers. This will give your product the respect it deserves.

Making the switch from pen and paper to managing operations on a mobile app, for example, can be daunting. At Connecteam, we offer small and local businesses a mobile hub where their workforce can communicate, manage operations, and develop professional skills from one mobile app. The tips above have been tried and tested successfully by Connecteam users who have made the switch.


Eyal Katz is a published author with hundreds of articles providing tips and advice for small businesses owners and managers. Eyal also heads marketing for Connecteam, a mobile hub of operations for businesses that manage deskless and mobile workers.